nbcnews:

Teenager arrested for threatening tweet to airline
(Photo via Twitter)
Dutch police have arrested a 14-year-old girl in Rotterdam after she sent a tweet threatening American Airlines on Sunday.
Continue reading

nbcnews:

Teenager arrested for threatening tweet to airline

(Photo via Twitter)

Dutch police have arrested a 14-year-old girl in Rotterdam after she sent a tweet threatening American Airlines on Sunday.

Continue reading

(Source: NBCNews.com)

atlasobscura:

Hand of Glory: The Macabre Magic of Severed Hands

A traditional form of punishment, under Sharia, Islamic law, and in Medieval Europe, involved publicly amputating a criminal’s body part, often the one used to commit a crime.

The pain of the amputation and the shame of the permanent mark served as punishment for the criminal, while the display of the severed limb functioned as a sinister warning to all onlookers: follow in this guy’s footsteps and you will suffer a similar fate. This macabre tradition likely has its roots in the Code of Hammurabi.

In Europe, the severed hands of criminals were displayed like relics to prevent future grievances (a thief’s arm still dangles in a Prague church). In most cases the owner of the hand was not known, but the provenance was usually irrelevant because the setting of the hand’s exhibition determined the story that was told about its origin.

The Haunch of Venison in Wiltshire, England, is a 684-year-old pub that was famous for its display of a cursed gambler’s hand. The hand was reportedly amputated from a gambler who was caught cheating during a game of whist a few hundred years ago. According to workers at the pub, a butcher chopped the gambler’s hand off and threw it into the fireplace. The grisly relic was discovered during renovation work at the pub in 1911 and was stored in a locked glass case with a pack of 18th century playing cards. In 2010, thieves unscrewed the glass cabinet and stole the criminal’s relic.

For the full, sordid history of severed hands, keep reading on Atlas Obscura!

(via thecadaverousportrait)

Utah woman accused in death of six infants


(Source: NBCNews.com, via nbcnews)

pulitzerfieldnotes:

What Absence Does
When Carlo’s* mother left to work in Dubai as a nanny, he was about 5 or 6 years old. He didn’t understand what “working abroad” meant and he was happy to see his mom go. 
“She promised that when she came back, she would buy me a bike,” says Carlo, now twelve.
His mother has been away for some years now and the last time he saw her was last Christmas. She hasn’t been calling lately and he doesn’t know why. It’s been two or three months since they last spoke. He can’t call her because her employer will get mad if they see her talking on the phone.

Carlo’s grandmother and his mom’s sister take turns looking after him, but since both of them have to work, he often finds himself at home alone. Sometimes he doesn’t go to school because there is no lunch money or because no one will notice anyway.

"The saying, ‘Absence makes the heart grow fonder’ simply isn’t true sometimes,” says Lily Brul, president of the Laguna OFW (Overseas Filipino Workers) Confederation.
“Sometimes absence just makes the heart forget. It doesn’t just happen between a husband and a wife. It also happens between mothers and their children.”
*Name changed

Text by Ana P. Santos. Image by Geric Cruz.  Laguna, Philippines, 2014.

For her upcoming project, Pulitzer Center grantee Ana P. Santos will report on Filipino women working as nannies in Dubai, United Arab Emirates and in Paris, France entitled, “Who Takes Care of Nanny’s Children?”

pulitzerfieldnotes:

What Absence Does

When Carlo’s* mother left to work in Dubai as a nanny, he was about 5 or 6 years old. He didn’t understand what “working abroad” meant and he was happy to see his mom go. 

“She promised that when she came back, she would buy me a bike,” says Carlo, now twelve.

His mother has been away for some years now and the last time he saw her was last Christmas. She hasn’t been calling lately and he doesn’t know why. It’s been two or three months since they last spoke. He can’t call her because her employer will get mad if they see her talking on the phone.

Carlo’s grandmother and his mom’s sister take turns looking after him, but since both of them have to work, he often finds himself at home alone. Sometimes he doesn’t go to school because there is no lunch money or because no one will notice anyway.

"The saying, ‘Absence makes the heart grow fonder’ simply isn’t true sometimes,” says Lily Brul, president of the Laguna OFW (Overseas Filipino Workers) Confederation.

“Sometimes absence just makes the heart forget. It doesn’t just happen between a husband and a wife. It also happens between mothers and their children.”

*Name changed

Text by Ana P. Santos. Image by Geric Cruz.  Laguna, Philippines, 2014.

For her upcoming project, Pulitzer Center grantee Ana P. Santos will report on Filipino women working as nannies in Dubai, United Arab Emirates and in Paris, France entitled, “Who Takes Care of Nanny’s Children?”

meninthistown:

I’m really excited to finally share with you the cover art for the Men In This Town book! After countless versions, we narrowed it down to two images and ultimately felt this photo encapsulated what this decade in menswear is all about.
Men In This Town is now available to pre-order through the links below:
Australia: BookworldUnited States: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, IndieBoundUnited Kingdom: AmazonCanada: Amazon, Indigo
Thank you for all your support and I can’t wait for you to see the final result!

meninthistown:

I’m really excited to finally share with you the cover art for the Men In This Town book! After countless versions, we narrowed it down to two images and ultimately felt this photo encapsulated what this decade in menswear is all about.

Men In This Town is now available to pre-order through the links below:

Australia: Bookworld
United States: 
AmazonBarnes & NobleIndieBound
United Kingdom: Amazon
Canada: AmazonIndigo

Thank you for all your support and I can’t wait for you to see the final result!

(Source: luciacostamagna1, via irwonder)

travelthisworld:

Blue hour in Bergen
Bergen, Norway | by Fougerouse Arnaud

(Source: talented10th, via finnharries)